Who We Best Serve

One size fits all?

You are unique! How you got here; where you want to go; and how you plan to get there have been, and continue to be, the footprints in your personal narrative. First, Calo Young Adults “listens” and “hears” your special story. Next, we guide you toward a path that takes you from your past into a present that promises hope and that defines a new direction. And then, we show you how to initiate meaningful movement toward a future that includes reconnections with family, peers, school, work, and life!

Our model is both flexible and research driven and allows us to create, with you, a unique and individualized treatment plan that will give you the confidence you need to take your next step. Readiness to move forward is self-determined and is based on the pace at which you choose to work. However, it is worth noting that during the past year, Calo Young Adults students who successfully attained readiness did so in an average of 9 months with a range in length of stay from as little as 6 months to a maximum of 18 months.

What does the future look like for you? How you draw that picture is your creative expression of that adult you hope to become. However, the future for most students who progress beyond their work at Calo Young Adults is represented by various combinations of the following emerging adult scenarios:

The course for this future plan” focuses on college readiness skills such as organization, self-advocacy, persistence, and self-management. Young adults who can benefit from our college prep/re-entry prescription include students who successfully completed high school and that while college looked promising for them, they were unable to enroll because some problem got in their way. If you are one of those students, developing deeper confidence and new skills that allow you to ask for the academic support you recognize and accept that you need will get you ready to attempt college as a regular student.

Other young adults who previously had attempted college and could have done well until clinical issues due to substance use, an eating disorder, social anxiety, depression, or any number of other problems surfaced and interrupted their progress may be motivated to address those barriers standing in the way of college re-entry. If you are a student who fits this category, Calo Young Adults can help you gain a deeper understanding of what happened. After you have identified and confronted the issues that led to disruption of your educational plan, you will be ready to take advantage of all a college support program has to offer. As part of the Calo Young Adults College track, you will attend classes part-time at one of our local colleges. Because balancing both academic requirements with programmatic commitments is often a skill that can be learned with repeated practice, students entering Calo Young Adults 4 to 6 weeks prior to fall or spring college registration can usually complete this track in 9-12 months. Those who enter after registration or during early summer will require longer time.

College is not for everybody, at least not at the time of Calo Young Adults admission. For some, exploration of the world of work might be a worthwhile initial choice. Want to live independently while working fulltime? Perhaps you want to return to college eventually but want to get a job first and save some money? Or, maybe you want to do both by attending college part-time while working?

The Calo Young Adults “future plan” for Early Career focuses on social skills, time management, resume development, and career exploration all within the context of intensive therapeutic opportunities for personal growth and development in a supportive residential community. If you think that you would like to investigate career options prior to making a vocational choice, Calo Young Adults might be an option for you. Some students on this path might also choose to finish an on-line high school program or obtain a GED.

While all “future plans” at Calo Young Adults are individualized, this one is especially customized for you. Upon discharge from a hospital or residential facility, Calo Young Adults can guide your reintegration into “real life”, not only with intensive therapeutic guidance, but also with residential supports that allow you to safely practice and apply new life skills. Of course, those in other Calo Young Adults tracks also might elect to work on specific personal goals. In either case, Calo Young Adults can work with you to develop a program especially tailored to you and your specific needs and goals.

While offering full program participation, this option often can be accomplished in 3 to 6 months especially if the plan is to step-down to a less intensive support program. Then, after completion of your personal goal program, you might choose to continue with Calo Young Adults and enroll in our graduate program, Reaching Beyond, or you might decide to attend another less structured program.

At Calo Young Adults, learn and practice self-management of your finances, your time, and your household. Our benchmarks are within your reach and can get you ready for life on your own.

General Requirements and Exclusions

Placement at Calo Young Adults is voluntary, and those admitted are free to leave at any time. For those who choose to participate, markers of progress include:

  • recognition of the need for treatment,
  • identification of reasons for placement,
  • clarification of goals, and
  • specification of treatment blocks and resistance.

The Calo Young Adults milieu and community based programming include participation in the tasks of everyday life in a manner that facilitates the development/enhancement of independent living skills, including personal and financial management. As an aspect of a full and meaningful life, our schedule includes active wellness and appropriate adult activities such as school, employment and volunteer work.

Applicants to Calo Young Adults are evaluated based on a number of factors including diagnosis of behavioral and substance abuse history. Characteristics of those excluded from admission include:

  • below average cognitive functioning,
  • inability to form relationships with peers and staff, e.g., antisocial and/or conduct disorder history with behavior pattern of disregard for others,
  • disorders of aggression and/or impulsive behavior including active substance abuse or a history of sexually aggressive or abusive behaviors, and
  • any need for secure (locked) placement with 24/7 on site staffing such as necessitated by danger to self or others.

Individual Profiles

  • Connector.

    Anxiety Disorders - Panic Disorder

    Before

    I’ve been in therapy since I was 12. My parents sent me to a psychologist after my first panic attack. I’ve been going every week since then, but I still have such terrible anxiety that sometimes I think I’m dying. And these thoughts! What I think about is so horrible… Read More

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    Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Before

    All I’ve wanted since high school was to have a girlfriend. In my senior year, I thought this girl wanted to date me because she would smile at me when we passed in the hall. So, I started to message her on social media. She never answered, so I thought … Read More

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    Bipolar Disorder

    Before

    I’ve been having mood swings since I was a teen-ager. At first, no one seemed to notice how I could be so depressed for weeks, sometimes months, and then change to this outgoing, talkative but irritable and angry person who then became attracted to guys I would not usually like. … Read More

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    Borderline Personality Disorder

    Before

    I hate everybody! My boyfriend broke up with me two days ago, but I’ve been calling him every chance I get. I think he’s tried to block my number. So, I’ve decided to go to his house and knock on the door until he answers. I can’t stand it! Every … Read More

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    Depressive Disorders

    Before

    I have felt sad and angry and worried most of my life. The first time I remember these feelings was when I was in kindergarden. The first day, my mom sat with me at the little table, and we colored with crayons. When the time came for my mom to … Read more

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    Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder: Executive Functioning Deficits

    Before

    I first found out about my ADHD when I was a kid. My teachers told my parents that I needed to take a test, and after a few weeks, the school psychologist met with all of us and said that I had a problem, but that she could tell me … Read More

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    Eating Disorder

    Before

    Since I was 8, I’ve been looking in the mirror and seeing a fat person. When I was 13, I went on a diet and ate only carrots and celery. I would run 10 miles before school and exercise for three hours after I got home. Then I would get … Read More

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    Gender Dysphoria

    Before

    Even as a kid, I felt different. I never wanted to wear dresses or play with dolls, but my parents thought I was just going through a stage, called me a “tom boy”, and didn’t seem concerned about my choices in friends or toys or clothes. Things changed when … Read More

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    Non-Substance-Related Disorders

    Before

    I’ve been playing games since I was 10, and “they” just noticed? They say they’re worried since I spend so much time in my room or in the basement with my computer. My days and nights sometimes get mixed up since I stay up all night playing, and then I … Read More

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    School Failure

    Before

    I didn’t make it through my first semester at college and had no choice except to withdraw and go home. I couldn’t finish any assignments. I felt paralyzed every time I tried to write a paper, and even if I did get something written, it was never good enough. The … Read More

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    Social Exclusion or Rejection

    Before

    I was begging my mom to let me change schools. I didn’t care that it was my senior year. I even asked if I could drop out of school and get my GED. She said no. I told her that I couldn’t stand to be bullied anymore. It’s not as if … Read More

  • Connector.

    Substance-Related Disorders

    Before

    I don’t know why we had that meeting with those people who kept saying they care about me. What did they call it anyway? An intervention? And what would I do in a wilderness program before I go to that other program, Calo Young Adults? No way am I going to … Read More

Parents – Families

Calo Young Adults parents want the best for their children.

We believe an important distinction in our approach to treatment is the inclusion of parents in the work with their emerging adult. While recognizing and respecting our students as adults and addressing their issues individually, we believe that results are aided by a simultaneous attention to the process of separation and individuation from parents. This focus can only be facilitated by family involvement.

After observing an emerging adult son or daughter exhibiting behaviors outside the typical range of accepted family norms concerned parents often respond by seeking professional advice and intervention from educators, psychiatrists, psycholofists, educational consultants and social workers.

Behaviors can include:

  • avoidance as exhibited by excessive social withdrawal and a refusal to engage in even family events,
  • failure in school and a lack of effort even when educational supports are offered,
  • lack of interest in typical young adult activities such as driving despite encouragement of family and friends,
  • depression and hopelessness about the future and lack of interest in former passions,
  • drug and/or alcohol abuse even after at least one, but sometimes more than one, legal and/or medical consequence.

Naturally confounded and puzzled after unsuccessful efforts to help their son or daughter, parents often feel exhausted, defeated and hopeless. Recognizing that their son or daughter is capable of more, they continue to search for the keys to understanding and unlocking their child’s true abilities and potential.

Parents are assisted in “letting go” and taught strategies that will allow their child to assume the role of primary responsibility for problem resolution. This process is facilitated by our ability to help both parents and young adults express themselves more openly with one another and as a result family communications improve. From our initial meeting with a student, we attempt to help each individual identify problems and articulate attainable goals. When this information is shared with parents, they naturally relax and a process of increasing responsibility by the young adult begins. As this process continues, the parent-child relationship evolves into an “adult parent-young adult” relationship.

Throughout the Calo Young Adults placement, parents receive:

  • Regular phone updates
  • Didactic instruction
  • Quarterly reviews
  • On-going orientation about the Calo Young Adults program
  • Opportunities to meet with other parents experiencing similar issues